Understanding Global Politics

University of Nottingham (2018)

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Course Handbook


1. Introduction: Studying Global Politics

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Lecture 1 Presentation

  • What is Global Politics
  • Why do we use theory in the study of global politics?
  • How is the module organised?

Seminar

  • What is ‘global politics’? Why is the term helpful in the 21st century?
  • What is meant by ‘international relations’? Does this term differ in meaning from ‘global politics’?
  • Why might theories of global politics/international relations be useful, even necessary?
  • What links exist between domestic and international politics?

Reading

Required Reading

Baylis, John, Steve Smith & Patricia Owens (2017) The Globalisation of World Politics, (7th edition) (Oxford: OUP),  Introduction

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Baylis, John, Steve Smith & Patricia Owens (2017) The Globalisation of World Politics, (7th edition) (Oxford: OUP),  Chapter 1

Recommended reading

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Heywood, Andrew (2014) Global Politics, 2nd edition (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan),  Chapter 1: Introducing Global Politics

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Jackson, Robert and Georg Sørenson (2012) International Relations: Theories and Approaches, 5th edition  (Oxford: OUP)  Chapter 1: Why Study IR?

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Snyder, Jack (2004) One World, Rival Theories, Foreign Policy, No.145 (Nov-Dec 2004), pp.52-62

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Walt, Stephen M. (1998) International Relations: One World, Many Theories, Foreign Affairs, No. 110, Special Edition: Frontiers of Knowledge (Spring 1998), pp.29-32, 34-46

Daddow, Oliver (2013) International Relations Theory: The Essentials, 2nd edition  (London: Sage),  Part 3 on lectures and seminars, pp.255-310

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2. Realism

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See also Realism and Neorealism page

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Lecture 2 Presentation

  • Two broad kinds of realism: Classical and Structural
  • Characteristics typical of both
  • A comparison

Seminar:

  • Is realism ethical, unethical or just not interested in ethics?
  • What are the main similarities and differences between classical and structural realism?
  • Are realists bellicists? (Do they support wars more often than not?)
  • What kind of picture do classical realists paint of human nature?  Is it realistic?
  • How do structural realists explain change in the international system?

Reading

Required Reading

Baylis, John, Steve Smith & Patricia Owens (2017) The Globalisation of World Politics, (7th edition) (Oxford: OUP), Chapter 8

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Waltz, Kenneth N. (1990) Realist Thought and Neorealist Theory,  Journal of International Affairs, Vol.44, No.1, pp.21-37

Recommended Reading

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Morgenthau, Hans J. (1948) ‘Six Principles of Political Realism’, in Robert J. Art and Robert Jervis (eds.), International Politics: Enduring Concepts and Contested Issues, 10th ed. (New York: Longman),  pp.7-14

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Mearsheimer, John J. (2014) Why the Ukraine Crisis is the West’s Fault: The liberal delusions that provoked Putin, Foreign Affairs (Sep-Oct 2013)

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Mearsheimer, John J. (2013) Anarchy and the Struggle for Power,  Chapter of, Essential Readings in World Politics, 5th ed., by Karen A. Mingst and Jack L. Snyder (eds.) (New York: W. W. Norton)

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Thucydides, ‘The Melian Dialogue,’ excerpt from History of the Peloponnesian War

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3. The Ubiquity of War

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See also War Studies page

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Lecture 3 Presentation

  • In the media
  • Vocabulary of war in sports, politics, etc.
  • Pop culture

Seminar:

  • What do realists argue are the causes of war?
  • Are wars examples of cooperative behaviour?
  • Has war changed since the end of the Cold War?
  • Have more recent wars challenged the realist approach to war?

Reading

Required Reading

Baylis, John, Steve Smith & Patricia Owens (2017) The Globalisation of World Politics, (7th edition)  (Oxford: OxUP), Chapter 14.

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Mearsheimer, John J. (2014) ‘Introduction,’ Chapter 1 of The Tragedy of Great Power Politics  (New York: Norton & Co.), pp.1-28

Recommended Reading

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Waltz, Kenneth (1986) ‘The Origins of War in Neorealist Theory,’ The Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Vol.18, No.4, pp.615-628

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Howard, Michael (1983) ‘The Causes of Wars,’ Chapter 1 of Causes of War, UK: Ashgate Publishing Ltd., pp.7-22

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Kaldor, Mary (2012) New and Old WarsSEE SIDEBAR

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Mead, Margaret (2013) ‘Warfare is Only an Invention – Not a Biological Necessity’, in Conflict After the Cold War: Arguments on causes of war and peace, by Richard K. Betts (editor) (New Jersey: Pearson) pp. 244-248

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4. Liberalism

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See also Liberalism and Neoliberalism page

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See also Democratic Peace Theory on War Studies page

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Lecture 4 Presentation

  • What is theory?
  • Characteristics of liberal thought
  • Characteristics of liberal International Relations
  • Foundational thinkers
  • Main focus of liberalism

Seminar:

  • What is liberalism generally (i.e. not just as an IR theory)?
  • According to liberal institutionalists, why do states cooperate?
  • Why do some liberal writers argue that democracies are unlikely to go to war with one another?
  • Is world order today liberal?
  • Is liberalism more realistic than realism?

Reading

Required reading

Baylis, John, Steve Smith & Patricia Owens (2017) The Globalisation of World Politics, (7th edition)  (Oxford: OUP),  Chapter 7

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Ikenberry, G. John (2011) The Future of the Liberal World Order: internationalism after America, Foreign Affairs, Vol.90, No.3 (May/Jun 2011), pp.56-62, 63-68

Recommended reading

Baylis, John, Steve Smith & Patricia Owens (2017) The Globalisation of World Politics, (7th edition) (Oxford: OUP),  Chapter 8

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Cobden, Richard (2002) ‘The Political Writings of Richard Cobden’, in  International Relations in Political Thought: Texts from the Ancient Greeks to the First World War, by Chris Brown, Terry Nardin and Nicholas Rengger (eds.)  (Cambridge: CUP), pp.538-549

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Doyle, Michael (1986) Liberalism and World Politics, American Political Science Review, Vol.80, No.4 (Dec 1986) pp.1151-1169

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Hawthorn, Geoffrey (1999) Liberalism since the Cold War: An enemy to itself?  Review of International Studies, Vol.25, The Interregnum: controversies in world politics, 1989-1999, (Dec 1999), pp.145-160

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Wilson, Woodrow (1918) ‘Fourteen Points,’

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Sørensen, Geor (2011) ‘Conclusion: Prospects for Liberal World Order,’ in Sørensen,  A Liberal World Order in Crisis: Choosing between imposition and restraint, pp.167-188  (Ithaca: Cornell University Press)

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5. Peace and International Institutions

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See also International Organizations page

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Lecture 5 Presentation

  • The origins of institutionalism
  • Liberal institutionalism and the United Nations
  • International Law and the ICC
  • Challenges to the liberal tradition

Seminar

  • Do international institutions contribute to peace?
  • How did liberal ideas influence the establishment of the UN?
  • What are the strengths and weaknesses of international law and the ICC?
  • What arguments do realists put forward for states joining international institutions?

Reading

Required Reading

Baylis, John, Steve Smith & Patricia Owens (2017) The Globalisation of World Politics, (7th edition) (Oxford: OUP), Chapter 20

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Keohane, Robert (2012) Twenty Years of Institutional Liberalism, International Relations, Vol.26, No.2, pp.125-138

Recommended Reading

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United Nations

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International Criminal Court (ICC)

Baylis, John, Steve Smith & Patricia Owens (2017) The Globalisation of World Politics, (7th edition)  (Oxford: OUP), Chapter 19; Chapter 21

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Hehir, Aiden (2013) ‘International Law, Justice and World Politics’, Chapter 18 in  Issues in 21st Century World Politics, by Mark Beeson and Nick Bisley (eds.), pp.251-262

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Thakur, Ramesh (2013) R2P after Libya and Syria: Engaging Emerging Powers, The Washington Quarterly, Vol.36, No.2, pp.61-76

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Mearsheimer, John (1990) Why we will soon miss the Cold War, The Atlantic, August

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6. Marxism

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See also Marxism-Leninism page

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Lecture 6 Presentation

Seminar:

  • Was Marx an ‘anti-capitalist’, in the sense, say, of many Occupy protestors?
  • How do Marxist views on economic matters in international affairs differ from liberal ones?
  • What is distinctive about Marxist international theory?
  • Is historical materialism scientific, as some think, or, as others do, a conspiracy theory?
  • What alternative visions of global politics do Marxists provide?

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Workshop: International Inequality

Reading

Required Reading

Baylis, John, Steve Smith & Patricia Owens (2017) The Globalisation of World Politics, (7th edition) (Oxford: OUP),  Chapter 8

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Callinicos, Alex (2007) Does Capitalism Need the State System?, Cambridge Review of International Affairs, Vol.20, No.4, pp.533-549

Recommended Reading

Anievas, Alexander (ed.) (2010) Marxism and World Politics: Contesting Global Capitalism  (Abingdon: Routledge)

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Cox, Robert (1981) Social Forces, States and World Orders: Beyond international relations theory, Millennium – Journal of International Studies, Vol.10, No.2, pp.126-155

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Davenport, Andrew (2013) Marxism in IR: Condemned to a realist fate?  European Journal of International Relations, Vol.19, No.1, pp.27-48

Halliday, Fred (1994) ‘A Necessary Encounter: Historical Materialism and International Relations,’ in Rethinking International Relations (Basingstoke: Palgrave)

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Lenin, Vladimir (1996) [1916] Imperialism: The Highest Stage of Capitalism, particularly:

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Chapter 7: ‘Imperialism as a Special Stage of Capitalism’

Interview: Hans Rosling on why most of the world is better off than you think …

 

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7. Globalisation and its Discontents

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Lecture 7 Presentation

Seminar

  • What is globalisation – is it a purely economic phenomenon?
  • What are the potential benefits and problems that emerge from globalisation?
  • What is the Marxist criticism of globalisation?
  • How can we empirically assess effects of globalisation?

Reading

Required Reading

Baylis, John, Steve Smith & Patricia Owens (2017) The Globalisation of World Politics, (7th edition) (Oxford: OUP),  Chapter 16

Recommended Reading

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Rodrik, Dani (2006) Goodbye Washington Consensus, Hello Washington Confusion?  A Review of the World Bank’s “Economic Growth in the 1990s: learning from a decade of reform,”  Journal of Economic Literature, Vol.44, No.4 (Dec 2006), pp.973-987

Stiglitz, Joseph (2002) Globalisation and Its Discontents (New York: Norton)

Reviews of Stiglitz, Joseph (2002)
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    Review: Eichengreen, B. (2002) Foreign Affairs, Vol.81, No.4 (Jul-Aug), pp.157-164

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    Review: Bonaglia, F. (2003) International Affairs, Vol.79, No.1 (Jan), pp.193-195

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    Review: Cunha, P. (2005) Journal of International Affairs, Vol.58, No.2, p.303

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    Review: Cohen & Rogers (2003) New Labor Forum, Vol.12 No.2 (Summer), pp.114-121

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Mosley, Layna and Saika Uno (2007) Racing to the Bottom or Climbing to the Top?  Economic Globalization and Collective Labor Rights, Comparative Political Studies, Vol.40, No.8, pp.923-948

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Janz, Nicole, Foreign Direct Investment and Repression: An Analysis Across Industry Sectors

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Dreher, Axel, Martin Gassebner & Lars-H.R. Siemers (2012) Globalisation, Economic Freedom and Human Rights, The Journal of Conflict Resolution, Vol.56, No.3 (Jun 2012), pp.516-546

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8. Constructivism

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See also Constructivism page

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Lecture 8 Presentation

Seminar

  • Why is constructivism called constructivism?
  • Do you agree with Alexander Wendt that ‘anarchy is what states make of it’?
  • Martha Finnemore and Kathryn Sikkink argue that a state’s conception of self-identity impacts on its international conduct.  What exactly does this mean?  Can you think of some examples from real-world global politics?
  • What is the difference between constitutive and regulative rules?  Does it matter for understanding global politics?

Reading

Required Reading

Baylis, John, Steve Smith & Patricia Owens (2017) The Globalisation of World Politics, (7th edition) (Oxford: OUP),  Chapter 9

Recommended Reading

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European Security Strategy 2003

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Adler, Emmanuel (1997) Seizing the Middle Ground: constructivism in world politics,’ European Journal of International Relations, Vol.3, No.3, pp.319-363

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Finnemore, Martha and Kathryn Sikkink (1998) International Norm Dynamics and Political Change, International Organization, Vol.52, No.4 (Autumn 1998), pp.887-917

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Onuf, Nicholas (1998) ‘Constructivism: A User’s Manual’, in Vendulka Kubalkova, in International Relations in a Constructed World, by Nocholas Onuf and Paul Kowert (eds.) (London: Routledge),  pp.58-78

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Ruggie, John (1998) Territoriality at Millennium’s End,’ Chapter 7 in Constructing the World Polity  (London: Routledge),  pp.172-197

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Brysk, Alison, Craig Parsons & Wayne Sandholtz (2002) After Empire: National Identity and Post-Colonial Families of Nations, European Journal of International Relations, Vol.8, No.2, pp.267-305

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9. International Human Rights Norms

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Lecture 9 Presentation

Seminar

  • Can members of the international community share a common understanding and norms?  How are norms diffused?
  • Are human rights a universal standard or do they merely reflect Western norms?
  • Are states vulnerable to naming and shaming campaigns when they do not adhere to international human rights norms?

Reading

Required Reading

Baylis, John, Steve Smith & Patricia Owens (2017) The Globalisation of World Politics, (7th edition) (Oxford: OUP),  Chapter 31

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Donnelly, Jack (2007) The Relative Universality of Human Rights, Human Rights Quarterly, Vol.29, No.2 (May 2007), pp.281-306

Recommended Reading

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Landman, Todd (2006) ‘Social Theory and Human Rights’, Chapter 3 of Studying Human Rights (London: Routledge),  pp.37-59

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Risse & Sikkink (1999) ‘The Socialization of International Human Rights Norms into Domestic Practices’, Chapter 1 of The Power of Human Rights: International Norms and Domestic Change, by Stephen C. Ropp and Kathryn Sikkink (eds.) (Cambridge: CUP), pp.1-38 SEE SIDEBAR

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Lebovic, James and Erik Voeten (2006) The Politics of Shame: The condemnation of country human rights practices in the UNCHR, International Studies Quarterly, Vol.50, No.4 (Dec 2006), pp.861-888

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10. Feminism

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See also Gender in IR page

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Lecture 10 Presentation

Seminar

  • Do feminist IR scholars agree with one another?  If they don’t, what do they disagree about?
  • Is International Relations a ‘gendered’ field of study?
  • Does gender make the world go round?
  • Are IR feminists guilty of forgetting about men?  Can men be feminists?
  • What would realist, liberal, Marxist and constructivist writers make of feminism in IR?

Reading

Required Reading

Baylis, John, Steve Smith & Patricia Owens (2017) The Globalisation of World Politics, (7th edition) (Oxford: OUP),  Chapter 12, Chapter 17.

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Cohn, Carol (1987) Sex and Death in the Rational World of Defense Intellectuals, Signs, Vol.12, No.4, Within and Without: Women, gender and theory (Summer 1987), pp.687-718

Recommended Reading

Enloe, Cynthia (2000) Bananas, Beaches and Bases: making feminist sense of international relations  (Berkeley: University of California Press)
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    1. Gender Makes the World the Go Round

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    3. Nationalism and Masculinity

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    6. Where are Women in the International Politics of Bananas?

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    7. Women’s Labor is Never Cheap

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    9. Conclusion

Jones, Adam (2009) Gender Inclusive: Essays on violence, men and feminist international relations  (London: Routledge)

Reviews of Jones, Adam (2009)
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    Review: Sjoberg, L. (2012), Cambridge Review of International Affairs, Vol.25, No.2, pp.307-309

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    Review: Hastie, R. (2009), Gender and Development, Vol.17, No.3 (Nov 2009), pp.535-537

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Jones, A. (2012) Imagining Gender and Conflict, Feminist Review, No.101, pp.132-141

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MacKinnon, Catherine (1993) ‘Crimes of War, Crimes of Peace’, UCLA Women’s Law Journal, Vol.4, No.1, pp. 59-86

Steans, Hull (2006) Gender and International Relations (2nd edition) (Cambridge: Polity Press)
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    Introduction

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    1. Gender in International Relations

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    2. Feminist International Relations

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    Conclusion

Weber, Cynthia (1994) Good Girls, Little Girls and Bad Girls: Male paranoia in Robert Keohane’s critique of feminist international relations, Millennium Journal of International  Studies, Vol.23, No.2, pp.337-349

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11. Revision

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Lecture 11 Presentation

Required Reading

Chapter 5 of School of Politics and International Relations, Undergraduate Student Handbook


Workshop Materials

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Workshop 1 – Academic Integrity

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Workshop 2 – Resource Discovery: Beginning to Use Library Collections for your Assignments

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Workshop 3 – Essay Writing

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Sample essay for workshop 3 on Essay Writing

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Workshop 4 – Feedback


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