International Security

University of Cambridge (2011)

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Course Outline

General Texts

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Core Text – Hough, Understanding Global Security (18MB download)

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Roberts & Zaum (2008) Selective Security: War and the UNSC Since 1945, Adelphi Paper 395


1. Foundational Concepts

What is security, war and peace?  How has the conceptualisation of these notions changed?  Who are now the principal actors in security – states, alliances, the UN, warlords, private military companies?

Reading

Required Reading

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Wirtz, James J. (2002) ‘A New Agenda for Security and Strategy?’ Chapter 16 in Strategy in the Contemporary World: An introduction to Strategic Studies, by John Baylis, James Wirtz, Colin Grey and Eliot Cohen (editors)

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Baylis, John (2001) ‘International and Global Security,’ Chapter 13 in The Globalization of World Politics, by John Baylis and S. Smith (editors)

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Banks, Michael (1991) ‘Four Conceptions of Peace,’ Chapter 13 in Conflict Management and Problem Solving, by Dennis J.D. Sandole and Ingrid Sandole-Staroste

Further Reading

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Franco, Andrés (2004) ‘Armed Nonstate Actors,’ Chapter 8 in The UN Security Council: from the Cold War to the 21st Century, David M. Malone (editor)

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Galtung, Johan (1969) Violence, Peace and Peace Research, Journal of Peace Research, Vol.6, No.3 (1969), pp.167-191

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Keen, David (1997) A Rational Kind of Madness, Oxford Agrarian Studies, Vol.25, No.1, pp.67-75

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Keen, David (2000) War and Peace: What’s the difference?  International Peacekeeping, Vol.7, No.4, pp.1-22

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Rothschild, Emma (1995) What is Security?  Daedalus, Vol.124, No.3, The Quest for World Order (Summer 1995), pp.53-98

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2. Globalization and War

What do we mean by the ‘global’ and by ‘globalisation’?  What is global governance?  How do globalisation and global governance help us understand war?

Reading

Required Reading

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Martell, Luke (2007) The Third Wave in Globalization Theory, International Studies Review, Vol.9, No.2, pp.173-196

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Finkelstein, Lawrence S. (1995) What is Global Governance? Global Governance, Vol.1, pp.367-372

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Barkawi, Tarak (2006) ‘Behind “Globalization”: nation-states, empires and democracies at war,’ Chapter 2 in Globalization and War, Oxford: Rowman & Littlefield

Further Reading

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Bauman, Zygmunt (2001) Wars of the Globalisation Era, European Journal of Social Theory, Vol.4, No.1, pp.11-28

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Hirst, Paul (2000) The Contours of Globalisation, Chapter 1 in Globalization in Question (3rd edition) by Paul First, Grahame Thompson and Simon Bromley

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Krasner, Stephen D. (2001), Sovereignty, Foreign Policy, No. 122 (Jan-Feb 2001), pp.20-22, 24, 26, 28-29

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Mann, Michael (2001) Globalization and September 11, New Left Review, Vol.12 (Nov-Dec 2001), pp.51-72

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Mann, Michael (1993) Nation-States in Europe and Other Continents: diversifying, developing, not dying, Daedalus, Vol.122, No.3 (Summer 1993), pp.115-140

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Murphy, Craig N. (2000) Global Governance: Poorly done and poorly understood, International Affairs, Vol.76, No.4 (Oct 2000), pp.789-803

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Weiss, Linda (1997) Globalisation and the Myth of the Powerless State, New Left Review, Vol.1, No.225, pp.3-27

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3. Human Security

How has war in the post-Cold War period been characterised?  What is meant by the notion of human security which rose to prominence during this period?

Reading

Required Reading

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Duffield, Mark (2001) Global Governance and the New Wars: the Merging of Development and Security, Chapter 2: ‘The Merging of Development and Security’, London: Zed Books

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Kaldor, M (2007) New and Old Wars (2nd edition), Chapter 4: The Politics of New Wars, Stanford University Press

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UN Development Report 1994, Chapter 2: New Dimensions of Human Security

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UN Development Report, 1994, Summary: An Agenda for the Social Summit

Further Reading

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Axworthy, L. (2001) Human Security and Global Governance: putting people first, Global Governance, Vol.7, No.1 (Jan-Mar 2001), pp.19-23

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Huntington, S. (1993) The Clash of Civilisations?  Foreign Affairs, Vol.72, No.3 (Summer 1993), pp.22-49

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Johnson, A. (2007) New Wars and Human Security: An Interview with Mary Kaldor, Democratiya, Vol.11 (Winter 2007), pp.14-35

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Kalyvas, S. (2001) “New” and “Old” Civil Wars: A Valid Distinction?  World Politics, Vol.54, No.1 (Oct 2001), pp.99-118

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Kaplan, R (1994) The Coming Anarchy, The Atlantic, February 1994

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King, G. and C.J. Murray (2001) Rethinking Human Security, Political Science Quarterly, Vol.116, No.4 (Winter 2001-2002), pp.585-610

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Paris, R. (2001) Human Security: Paradigm Shift or Hot Air? International Security, Vol.26, No.2 (Autumn 2001), pp.87-102

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Suhrke, Astri (1999) Human Security and the Interests of States, Security Dialogue, Vol.30, No.3, pp.265-276

Further Reading

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McCormack, Tara (2011), Conflict, Security and Development:  human security and the separation of security and development, Security and Development, Vol.11, No.2, pp.235-260

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4. Causes of War I

How does state failure lead to violence?  What role does identity, greed or grievance play in conflict?

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See Causes of War on the War Studies Page

5. Causes of War II

How do poverty, inequality, resource wealth and environmental scarcity contribute to conflict?

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See Correlates of War on the War Studies Page

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6. Orientalism and War

What is the postcolonial perspective and what does it bring to the study of international relations and conflict?

Reading

Required Reading

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Doty, Roxane (1996) Imperial Encounters: the politics of representation in North-South relations,  Chapter 1: Introduction, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, pp.1-19

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Said, Edward (2003) Orientalism, Chapter 1: Introduction,London: Penguin Books

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Barkawi, Tarak & Mark Laffey (2006) The Postcolonial Moment in Security Studies, Review of International Studies, Vol.32, No.4, pp.329-352

Further Reading

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Barkawi, Tarak (2004), Peoples, Homelands and Wars?  Ethnicity, the military and battle among British imperial forces in the war against Japan, Society for the Comparative Study of Society and History, pp.134-163

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Biswas, S (2002) ‘The “New Cold War”: Secularism, orientalist and postcolonial reality,’ Chapter 8 in Chowdry & Nair (editors)  Power, Postcolonialism and International Relations: Reading race, gender and class, London: Routledge, pp.184-208

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Cohn, B. (1996) Colonialism and its Forms of Knowledge: the British in India, Chapter1: Introduction, Princeton University Press

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Darby, Phillip (2004) Pursuing the Political: A postcolonial rethinking of relations international, Millennium Journal of International Studies, Vol.33, No.1, pp.1-32

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Ferguson, R and N Whitehead (1993) Chapter 9: A Savage Encounter in War in the Tribal Zone: expanding states and indigenous warfare, Santa Fe: School of American Research Press

Mamdani, M. (1996) Decentralized Despotism, Chapter 2 in Citizen and Subject: Contemporary Africa and the legacy of late colonialism.  Princeton

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de Goede (2017) An Analysis of Mahmood Mamdani’s Citizen and Subject, Chapter 1: Introduction, London: Routledge, pp.9-13

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McCormack, Brian (2002) Postcolonialism in an Age of Globalisation: Opening International Relations theory to identities in movement, Alternatives: Global, Local, Political, Vol.27, No.1 (Jan-Mar 2002), pp.99-115

Paolini, A. (1999) Beyond the Discourse of International Relations, Chapter 2 in Paolini, Elliott & Moran (editors), Navigating Modernity: Postcolonialism, Identity and International Relations, London and Boulder: Lynne Rienner

Porter, Patrick (2009) The Embattled West, Chapter 2 in Military Orientalism: Eastern War through Western Eyes, Columbia University Press

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Slater, David (1998) Post-Colonial Questions for Global Times, Review of International Political, Vol.5, No.4 (Winter 1998), pp.647-678

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7. Migration & Securitization

How can the theory of securitisation shed light on the ‘problematisation’ of migration?

Reading

Required Reading

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Williams, Michael (2003) Words, Images, Enemies: Securitization and International Politics, International Studies Quarterly, Vol.47, No.4, pp.511-531

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McDonald, Matt (2008) Securitization and the Construction of Security, European Journal of International Relations, Vol.14, No.4, pp.563-587

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Bigo, Didier (2002) Security and Immigration: Toward a critique of the governmentally of unease, Alternatives, Vol.27, Special Issue, pp.63-92

Further Reading

Anderson & Shuttleworth (2004) A New Spatial Fix for Capitalist Crisis?  Immigrant Labour, State Borders and the New Ostracising Imperialism, in van der Pijl, Assassi & Wigan (editors) Global Regulation, London: Macmillan

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Andreas, Peter (2003) Redrawing the Line: Borders and security in the twenty-first century, International Security, Vol.28, No.2 (Autumn 2003), pp.78-111

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Crisp, Jeff (2003) A New Asylum Paradigm?  Globalisation, migration and the uncertain future of the international refugee regime, New Issues in Refugee Research, Working Paper No. 100, Evaluation and Policy Analysis Unit, UNCHR

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Goodwin-Gill, Guy (2001) Refugees: Challenges to Protection, International Migration Review, Vol.35, No.1 (Spring 2001), pp.130-142

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Huysmans, Jef (1995) Migrants as a Security Problem: danger of ‘securitising’ societal issues, Chapter 3 in Miles & Thränhardt, Migration and European Integration: the dynamics of inclusion and exclusion, Madison: Pinter, pp.53-72

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Hyndman, Jennifer (2007) The Securitization of Fear in Post-Tsunami Sri Lanka, Annals of the Association of American Geographers, Vol.97, No.2, pp.361-372

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Lischer, Sarah (2008) Security and Displacement in Iraq: responding to the Forced Migration Crisis, International Security, Vol.33, No.2 (Fall 2008), pp.95-119

Nyers, P (2006) Rethinking Refugees: Beyond States of Emergency, London: Routledge

Pahlavan, Tscanguiz (2004) Conflict and Transformation: new forms of nation-state, Chapter 12 in Friedman & Randeria (editors) Worlds on the Move: GlobalizationMigration and Cultural Security, London: I.B. Taurus

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Salehyan, Idean and Kristian Gleditsch (2006) Refugees and the Spread of Civil War, International Organization, Vol.60, No.2 (Spring), pp.335-366

Sharma, N. (2006) White Nationalism, Illegality and Imperialism: border controls as ideology, in Hunt & Rygiel (editors), Engendering the War on Terror, London: Macmillan, pp.121-144

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Stritzel, Holger (2007) Towards a Theory of Securitization: Copenhagen and Beyond, European Journal of International Relations, Vol.13, No.3, pp.357-383

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8. Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism

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See also Terrorism on the Global Security page

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See also The Global War on Terror on the Problems in Global Politics page

What can the theory of exception add to our understandings of how responses to terrorism are shaped and the politics that such understandings serve?

Reading

Required Reading

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Hoffmann, Bruce (1998) Defining Terrorism, Chapter 1 in Inside Terrorism, London: Victor Golliancz

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Aradau, Claudia and Rens Van Munster (2007) Governing Terrorism Through Risk: Taking precautions, (un)knowing the future, European Journal of International Relations, Vol.13, No.1, pp.89-115

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Colás, Alejandro (2010) An Exceptional Response?  Security, development and civil society in Spanish policy after 11-M, Development and Change, Vol.41, No.2, pp.313-333

Further Reading

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Barkawi, Tarak (2004), On the Pedagogy of ‘Small Wars,’ International Affairs, Vol.80, No.1, pp.19-38

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De Mesquita, Ethan (2005) Conciliation, Counterterrorism and Patterns of Terrorist Violence, International Organization, Vol.59, No.1 (Winter), pp.145-176

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Dillon, Michael and Luis Lobo-Guerrero (2008) Biopolitics of security in the 21st century: an introduction, Review of International Security, Vol.34, No.2, pp.265-292

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Euben, Roxanne (2002) Killing (For) Politics: Jihad, Martyrdom and Political Action, Political Theory, Vol.30, No.1 (Feb), pp.4-35

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Gerges, Fawaz (2005) The Far Enemy: Why Jihad Went Global, Chapter 1: Introduction,  Cambridge University Press SEE SIDEBAR

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Guelke, Adrian (2006) Counter-terrorism, Chapter 9 in Terrorism and Global Disorder: Political violence and the contemporary world, London: I.B. Taurus

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Keen, David (2006) Shame, Purity and Violence, Chapter 9 in Endless War? Hidden functions of the ‘War on Terror,’ London: Pluto Press, pp.160-189

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Keohane, Robert (2002) The Public Deligitimation of Terrorism and Coalitional Politics, Chapter 12 in Ken Booth & Tim Dunne (editors), Worlds in Collision: Terror and the future of the global order, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp.141-151

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Rees, Wyn and Richard Aldrich (2005) Contending Cultures of Counterterrorism: Transatlantic divergence or convergence?  International Affairs, Vol.81, No.5, pp.905-923

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Von Hippel, Karin (2002) The Roots of Terrorism: probing the myths, chapter in Lawrence Freedman (editor), Superterrorism: Policy Responses, Blackwell, pp.25-39


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